MASTER’S PROGRAMS

The Master’s degrees offer students a chance to advance their knowledge above that of the undergraduate level, and a chance to begin to specialize in one of the sub-disciplines of Civil or Environmental Engineering. All Master’s degrees may require that students take one or more undergraduate courses as articulation (pre-requisite) if they are coming from a different undergraduate engineering or a related science field in order to become fully prepared for graduate work in Civil or Environmental Engineering.

Tracks

MSCE

The Master of Science in Civil Engineering degree is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering or another closely related engineering degree. Graduate work and research in civil engineering reflect the very broad nature of the field, which encompasses the design, construction, and enhancement of the infrastructure of society.

Elective Courses: 24 Credit Hours

Thesis MS students must take a minimum of 24 credit hours of course work with at least 18 credit hours from the Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering (CECE) Department in their program of study.

Nonthesis MS students must take at least 24 credit hours of course work from the CECE Department in their program of study. Nonthesis students must take at least one course where a research project is required (one course marked with an asterisk).

Geotechnical Engineering

Structural Engineering

Transportation Engineering

Water Resources Engineering

Construction Engineering and Management

Portfolio Requirement

Students are required to complete a culminating experience. The culminating experience for non-thesis MS students is a submission of their portfolio of activities by the course Withdrawal date of the semester prior to their intended graduation.

  1.  Resume: Students updated resume including education, skills, projects completed, work experience if any, publications if any
  2. Summary: 1-page summary in your own words of how the degree and the projects contributed to your skills and knowledge, and to your overall understanding of the field.
  3. Project Summaries: Choose 2-course projects and include a 1-page summary for each project. The summaries will consist of four particular sections and the following information must be provided:
    • Project Description and Problem Identification
    • Data Collection, Results, Interpretations
    • Conclusions
    • Engineering Knowledge Gained and Application Areas

Format:

  • 12 pts New Times Roman, single line spacing, 1-inch margins.
  • The portfolio needs to be 1 PDF file.

Portfolio Assessment by the Advisor

Advisor’s Evaluation:
Acceptable
Not acceptable

If the Advisor’s Evaluation is not acceptable, please state what you expect in the next submission?

Portfolio Submission Workflow:

  1. The student will submit the portfolio to the Graduate Program Assistant (GPA), Ms. Salas, within the last two terms of their study. The deadline to submit the portfolio for their last semester will be set early enough to allow for processing.
    • GPA will confirm if the student is eligible for portfolio submission. If the student is not eligible, GPA will inform the student.
  2. If the student is eligible, GPA will confirm that the portfolio is submitted as one file. If not, GPA will email the student and ask the student to re-submit.
  3. GPA will forward the file to the student’s advisor together with the portfolio guidelines and assessment document. The advisor will be given 2 weeks to do the assessment.
  4. The advisor will e-mail their assessment to GPA.
    • If the evaluation is not acceptable, the student will have to re-submit. 2 submissions per semester are allowed. If both of these submissions are not acceptable, the student will have to wait for the next semester to re-submit. A maximum of 4 submissions will be allowed.
    • If the evaluation is acceptable by the advisor:
      GPA will prepare a letter to inform the student that their portfolio submission is accepted.

MSENVE

The Master of Science in Environmental Engineering program was created for students who have an undergraduate degree in environmental engineering or any other closely related degree in engineering. Applicants are expected to be knowledgeable in topics including chemistry, process design, water resources, and air pollution. The program focuses on pollution control, pollution prevention, and the correction of pollution effects on natural and man-made environments.

Prerequisites (Articulation)

The completion of prerequisite courses may be required before students can begin the program graduate coursework.

The following mathematics prerequisite requirement is for all students.

  • Calculus through Differential Equations

The following prerequisites (or equivalent courses) may be required for students with appropriate science or math undergraduate degrees.

  • ENV 3001 – Introduction to Environmental Engineering 3 Credit Hours
  • CWR 3201 – Engineering Fluid Mechanics 3 Credit Hours
  • STA 3032 – Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3 Credit Hours
  • CWR 4202 – Hydraulics 3 Credit Hours
  • CWR 4120 – Hydrology 3 Credit Hours
  • EES 4111C – Biological Process Control 3 Credit Hours
  • EES 4202C – Chemical Process Control 3 Credit Hours
  • EGN 3613 – Engineering Economic Analysis 2 Credit Hours
  • ENV 4120 – Air Pollution Control 3 Credit Hours
  • ENV 4531 – Environmental Engineering Operations and Processes I 3 Credit Hours

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours

Students must choose one course from each group.

Civil Water Resources

  • Any CWR course at the 5000 or 6000 level 3 Credit Hours. See course listings in the drop-down catalog menu above.

Note: Courses with an asterisk (*) provide independent learning experiences. Nonthesis students are required to take at least one course with an asterisk. This criteria is fulfilled by taking the requiredENV 6106 – Theory and Practice of Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling course.

It is also met by the elective courses:

Elective Courses—12 Credit Hours

All students, both thesis and nonthesis, are required to take 12 credit hours of elective courses.  Courses that comprise the elective part of the program are selected in accordance with the general requirements of the College of Engineering and Computer Science and often include courses taken from the following two sub-discipline areas:

  • Environmental Specialization—Any of the appropriate ENV graduate-level courses (5000 or 6000) with the consent of the student’s adviser
  • Water Resources Specialization—Any of the appropriate CWR graduate-level courses (5000 or 6000) with the consent of the student’s adviser

MSES (M.S. – ENV. ENGINEERING SCIENCES TRACK)

The Master of Science in Environmental Engineering program was created for students who have an undergraduate degree in environmental engineering or any other closely related degree in engineering. Applicants are expected to be knowledgeable in topics including chemistry, process design, water resources, and air pollution. The program focuses on pollution control, pollution prevention, and the correction of pollution effects on natural and man-made environments.

Prerequisites (Articulation)

The completion of prerequisite courses may be required before students can begin the program graduate coursework.

The following mathematics prerequisite requirement is for all students.

  • Calculus through Differential Equations

The following prerequisites (or equivalent courses) may be required for students with appropriate science or math undergraduate degrees.

  • ENV 3001 – Introduction to Environmental Engineering 3 Credit Hours
  • CWR 3201 – Engineering Fluid Mechanics 3 Credit Hours
  • STA 3032 – Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3 Credit Hours
  • CWR 4202 – Hydraulics 3 Credit Hours
  • CWR 4120 – Hydrology 3 Credit Hours
  • EES 4111C – Biological Process Control 3 Credit Hours
  • EES 4202C – Chemical Process Control 3 Credit Hours
  • EGN 3613 – Engineering Economic Analysis 2 Credit Hours
  • ENV 4120 – Air Pollution Control 3 Credit Hours
  • ENV 4531 – Environmental Engineering Operations and Processes I 3 Credit Hours

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours

Students must choose one course from each group.

Civil Water Resources

  • Any CWR course at the 5000 or 6000 level 3 Credit Hours. See course listings in the drop-down catalog menu above.

Note: Courses with an asterisk (*) provide independent learning experiences. Nonthesis students are required to take at least one course with an asterisk. This criteria is fulfilled by taking the requiredENV 6106 – Theory and Practice of Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling course.

It is also met by the elective courses:

Elective Courses—12 Credit Hours

All students, both thesis and nonthesis, must take 12 credit hours of elective courses. The electives should be chosen from courses with ENV or CWR prefixes although other appropriate graduate-level courses (5000 or 6000) may be allowed. All electives must be chosen with the consent of the student’s adviser.

  • Electives 12 Credit Hours

M.S. – STRUCTURES AND GEOTECHNICAL TRACK

The Structural and Geotechnical Engineering track in the Civil Engineering MS program reflects the very broad nature of the field, which encompasses the design, construction, and enhancement of the infrastructure of society. The program’s course work focuses on structural analysis and design, and geotechnical engineering and foundations, but may include electives in transportation planning and operations, traffic engineering, construction engineering, and water resources engineering.

Prerequisites (Articulation)

  • EGN 3310 – Engineering Analysis—Statics 3 Credit Hours
  • EGN 3321 – Engineering Analysis—Dynamics 3 Credit Hours
  • EGN 3331 – Mechanics of Materials 3 Credit Hours
  • CEG 4011C – Geotechnical Engineering I 4 Credit Hours
  • CES 4100 – Structural Analysis 4 Credit Hours
  • CES 4605 – Steel Structures 3 Credit Hours or
  • CES 4702 – Reinforced Concrete Structures 3 Credit Hours

Required Courses: 12 Credit Hours

Both thesis and nonthesis students must choose two courses from each of the two following groups. Courses with asterisks represent those with specific independent learning experiences and all nonthesis students must choose at least one of the courses with an asterisk.

Elective Courses: 12 Credit Hours

All students, both thesis and nonthesis, must complete at least 12 credit hours of approved electives (primarily from the above two groups but also from the list below or other courses as approved by the student’s adviser). Please note that Directed Research (XXX 6918) is not permitted in the MS program of study.

Portfolio Requirement

Students are required to complete a culminating experience. The culminating experience for nonthesis MS students is submission of an end-of-program portfolio.

Description of the MS Graduation Portfolio:

Geotechnical-Structural Engineering Emphasis The student must provide to the coordinator of the structural-geotechnical emphasis a 5-page very­well written paper summarizing the reasons for collapse of any structural or geotechnical system published in the technical literature. The paper should have a short title with your name and a descriptive title, and should be written following these guidelines:

  • Format: 8.5 x 11-inch paper, margins I-inch all around, font Times New Roman size 11, document formatted in single space, and no spaces separating paragraphs.
  • Content: The written paper can include a maximum of 5 figures/tables that can be used to demonstrate the main points of the paper. The figures and tables must be properly referenced in the text, otherwise they will be considered plagiarism. The faculty will pass the paper through plagiarism detection analyses pairing the document with online research databases to verify the ideas proposed by the student are original and not a direct copy from any source. At the end of the document (not included in the 5-page limit), the student must provide a list of references used to explain the main engineering reasons and concepts that triggered failures of the strnctural, geotechnical, or geo-structural system.
  • Purpose: This po1tfolio should evidence the student ability to state theoretical concepts and ability to connect concepts systematically in the area of study. The student must be able to apply theories learned during the class work in the structural/geotechnical engineering emphasis at UCF to explain the main reasons of collapse or failure of the selected case history. This portfolio is designed so that the student demonstrates his/her ability to formulate a specific research question or f:ormulate hypotheses on how the selected structural, geotechnical or geo-structural system collapsed/failed. The student must state clear evidence of the concepts learned through the classwork that are used to explain the main mechanisms that triggered failures. The student must be able to describe in technically sound English writing the experiments, surveys, field or laboratory investigations developed for during the analysis.

MS Portfolio Evaluation Criteria: Geotechnical-Structural Emphasis

The faculty in charge of evaluating the portfolio will provide a sumrnative grade based on the following criteria:

  • Goal 1: Does the portfolio provide evidence of a familiarity with structural or geotechnical engineering fields? Rating provided by faculty evaluator from 1-5 (I= poor, 5= excellent).
  • Goal 2: Does the portfolio show the ability to summarize and apply basic theoretical concepts learned during the master’s program with emphasis in geotechnical or structural engineering? Rating provided by faculty evaluator from 1-5 (1 = poor, 5= excellent).
  • Goal 3: Does the portfolio demonstrate the student understanding of the ways in which structural and/or geotechnical engineers gather, interpret, and evaluate data? Rating provided by faculty evaluator from 1-5 (1 = poor, 5= excellent).
  • Goal 4: Does the portfolio demonstrate a broad use of engineering concepts to explain the conditions that triggered failure? Rating provided by faculty evaluator from 1-5 (1 = poor, 5= excellent).
  • Goal 5: Does the portfolio demonstrate an ability to think critically, analytically, and logically about engineering issues and problems associated to the case history, using technically sound written English? Rating provided by faculty evaluator from 1-5 (1 = poor, 5= excellent).

M.S. – TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS ENGINEERING TRACK

The Transportation Systems Engineering track in the Civil Engineering MS program reflects the very broad nature of the field, which encompasses the design, construction, and enhancement of the transportation infrastructure of society. The program’s course work focuses on transportation planning and operations, traffic engineering, and construction engineering.

Prerequisites

  • STA 3032 – Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3 Credit Hours
  • TTE 3810 – Transportation Engineering 3 Credit Hours

Required Courses: 15 Credit Hours

Both thesis and nonthesis students must choose five of the following courses. Courses with asterisks provide independent learning experiences. These experiences encompass research reports, design projects, and literature studies. Nonthesis students must choose at least one course with an asterisk.

Elective Courses: 9 Credit Hours

All students, both thesis and nonthesis, must complete at least 9 credit hours of approved electives from the list above or other courses as approved by the student’s adviser. Directed Research (XXX 6918) is not permitted in the MS program of study.

  • Electives 9 Credit Hours

Portfolio Requirement

Students are required to complete a culminating experience. The culminating experience for non-thesis MS students is a submission of an end-of-program portfolio. the portfolio requirements are listed on the CECE website.

  1. Resume: Students updated resume including education, skills, projects completed, work experience if any, publications if any
  2. Summary: 1-page summary in your own words of how the degree and the projects contributed to your skills and knowledge, and to your overall understanding of the field.
  3. Project Summaries: Choose 2-course projects and include a 1-page summary for each project. The summaries will consist of four particular sections and the following information must be provided:
    • Project Description and Problem Identification
    • Data Collection, Results, Interpretations
    • Conclusions
    • Engineering Knowledge Gained and Application Areas

Format:

  • 12 pts New Times Roman, single line spacing, 1-inch margins.
  • The portfolio needs to be 1 PDF file.

Portfolio Assessment by the Advisor

Advisor’s Evaluation:
Acceptable
Not acceptable

If the Advisor’s Evaluation is not acceptable, please state what you expect in the next submission?

Portfolio Submission Workflow:

  1. The student will submit the portfolio to the Graduate Program Assistant (GPA), Ms. Salas, within the last two terms of their study. The deadline to submit the portfolio for their last semester will be set early enough to allow for processing.
    • GPA will confirm if the student is eligible for portfolio submission. If the student is not eligible, GPA will inform the student.
  2. If the student is eligible, GPA will confirm that the portfolio is submitted as one file. If not, GPA will email the student and ask the student to re-submit.
  3. GPA will forward the file to the student’s advisor together with the portfolio guidelines and assessment document. The advisor will be given 2 weeks to do the assessment.
  4. The advisor will e-mail their assessment to GPA.
    • If the evaluation is not acceptable, the student will have to re-submit. 2 submissions per semester are allowed. If both of these submissions are not acceptable, the student will have to wait for the next semester to re-submit. A maximum of 4 submissions will be allowed.
    • If the evaluation is acceptable by the advisor:
      GPA will prepare a letter to inform the student that their portfolio submission is accepted.

M.S. – WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING TRACK

The Water Resources Engineering track in the Civil Engineering MS program reflects the very broad nature of the field, which encompasses the design, construction, and enhancement of the sustainable infrastructure for society. The program’s course work focuses on water resources modeling, hydraulics and hydrology.

Prerequisites (Articulation)

  • CEG 4011C – Geotechnical Engineering I 4 Credit Hours
  • CWR 4632C – Water Resources I 4 Credit Hours
  • CWR 4633C – Water Resources II 3 Credit Hours
  • EGN 3613 – Engineering Economic Analysis 2 Credit Hours
  • STA 3032 – Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3 Credit Hours

Required Courses: 15 Credit Hours

Both thesis and nonthesis students must choose five CWR courses from the list below. Courses with an asterisk provide an independent learning experience that involves research and design projects. Nonthesis students are required to take at least one course with an asterisk in order to obtain an independent learning experience.

Elective Courses: 9 Credit Hours

All students, both thesis and nonthesis, are required to take at least 9 credit hours of approved electives. The courses may be from the list above or other courses as approved by the student’s adviser. Directed Research (XXX 6918) is not permitted in the MS program of study

  • Electives 9 Credit Hours

Description of the M.S. Graduation Portfolio: Water Resources Engineering Emphasis

The portfolio includes three sections.

I. Resume

The student provides his/her updated resume, including education, skills, projects completed, work experience, if any, publications, if any.

II. One-page summary

The one-page summary, written in the student’s own language, includes 1) how the courses and projects contributed to the student’s skills and knowledge; 2) how the degree contributed to the understanding of the field.

III. Project Summaries

The student chooses two-course projects and includes a one-page summary for each project. The summaries will consist of four particular sections, and the following information must be provided:

  1. Project Description and Problem Identification
  2. Data Collection, Results, Interpretations
  3. Conclusions
  4. Engineering Knowledge Gained and Application Areas

Format: 8.5 x 11-inch paper, margins I-inch all around, font Times New Roman size 11, document formatted in single space.

M.S. Portfolio Evaluation Criteria: The faculty in charge of evaluating the portfolio will provide a summative grade based on the following criteria:

  • Goal 1: Does the portfolio provide evidence of familiarity with the water resources engineering field? Rating provided by faculty evaluator from 1-5 (I= poor, 5= excellent).
  • Goal 2: Does the portfolio demonstrate the student’s understanding of fundamental principles in water resources engineering? Rating provided by faculty evaluator from 1-5 (1 = poor, 5= excellent).
  • Goal 3: Does the portfolio demonstrate an ability to think critically and solve water resources engineering problems analytically and numerically. Rating provided by faculty evaluator from 1-5 (1 = poor, 5= excellent).
  • Goal 4: Does the portfolio demonstrate the student’s ability to write a sound technical report? Rating provided by faculty evaluator from 1-5 (1 = poor, 5= excellent).

M.S. – SMART CITIES ENGINEERING TRACK

The track is designed to help future Civil and Environmental Engineers to learn and adapt to the new challenges in the field of Smart Cities and be prepared for their professional roles through a state-of-the-art education. Elements of the track will bridge some of the gaps with other engineering disciplines and open the door for students to collaborate on research and education that are relevant to the cities of the future.

Required Course–3 Credit Hours

Both thesis and nonthesis students must choose this course:

Elective Courses—9 Credit Hours

All students, both thesis and non-thesis, are required to take at most 12 credit hours of approved electives. The courses may be from the list above or other courses as approved by the student’s adviser. Directed Research (XXX 6918) is not permitted in the MS program of study.

Thesis Option—6 Credit Hours

A successful defense of the thesis is required. In addition, the College of Engineering and Computer Science requires that all thesis defense announcements be approved by the student’s adviser and posted on the college’s website and on the university-wide Events Calendar at the College of Graduate Studies website at least two weeks before the defense date.

Nonthesis Option—6 Credit Hours

Nonthesis students must complete at least 6 additional credit hours of electives from either the list above or other courses as approved by the student’s adviser.

  • Electives 6 Credit Hours

Portfolio Requirement

Students are required to complete a culminating experience. The culminating experience for nonthesis MS students is submission of an end-of-program portfolio. The portfolio requirements are listed on the CECE website.

Thesis Option

The Master’s degree programs can either be research-oriented (thesis option) or non-research-oriented (non-thesis option). The Thesis option is the only option for students who are receiving a fellowship or assistantship (GTA or GRA) from the department. Therefore, it is strongly recommended for all full-time students, even those who think that they can pay for their own education. A minimum of twenty-four (24) semester hours of approved course work along with a minimum of six (6) hours of thesis credits is required.

  • A minimum of twenty-four (24) semester hours of approved course work along with a minimum of six (6) hours of thesis credits is required.
  • No more than six hours of thesis credits will be applied toward degree requirements.
  • At least 15 credit hours must be at the 6000-level (includes thesis hours).
  • A maximum of 9 semester hours of graduate credit may be transferred into the program from UCF non-degree-seeking status or regionally accredited institutions. Only grades of “B-” or better can be transferred.
  • A minimum “B” (3.0) average must be maintained in the program of study and no more than two C+, C, and C- grades are allowed. No D+ or lower grades are acceptable.
  • A written thesis and final oral defense are required.
  • Once six hours of thesis credits have been completed and all course work has been satisfied, the student is required to have continuous enrollment in one hour of thesis until the final thesis has been received by the Division of Graduate Studies (but also see next rule).
  • International students have to meet all Graduate Studies and ISS rules to remain in legal standing as a full-time student throughout their tenure at UCF.

Master’s Thesis Committee

  • The thesis committee will consist of a minimum of three members. All committee members should hold a doctoral degree and be in fields related to the thesis topic. At least two members must be department faculty (one to serve as chair). Off-campus experts, joint faculty members, adjunct faculty, and other university faculty members may serve as the third person in the committee.
  • In unusual cases, with approval from the Department Chair, two professors may chair the committee jointly. Joint faculty members may serve as committee chairs, but off-campus experts and adjunct faculty may not serve as committee chairs.
  • All members vote on acceptance or rejection of the thesis proposal and the final thesis. The final thesis must be approved by a majority of the advisory committee

Non-Thesis Option

  • With a requirement of 30 semester hours of coursework, the non-thesis option is intended primarily for part-time students.
  • The program requirements are the same as for the thesis option except that the thesis requirement is replaced by 6 credit hours of course work.
  • An advisor is required, and he/she will review and sign the program of study.
  • For nonthesis MS students, the culminating experience is the submission of a portfolio that satisfies program requirements:

Non-Thesis Exit Portfolio

Contents:

I. Resume: Students updated resume including education, skills, projects completed, work experience if any, publications if any
II. Summary: 1-page summary in own words of how the degree and the projects contributed to your skills and knowledge, and to your overall understanding of the field.
III. Project Summaries: Choose 2 course projects and include 1-page summary for each project. The summaries will consist of four particular sections and the following information must be provided:

  • Project Description and Problem Identification
  • Data Collection, Results, Interpretations
  • Conclusions
  • Engineering Knowledge Gained and Application Areas

Format:

      • 12 pts New Times Roman, single line spacing, 1 inch margins.
      • The portfolio needs to be 1 PDF file.

Portfolio Assessment by the Advisor

Advisor’s Evaluation:
Acceptable
Not acceptable

If Advisor’s Evaluation is not acceptable, please state what you expect in the next submission?

Portfolio Submission Workflow:

    1. The student will submit the portfolio to the Graduate Program Assistant (GPA), Ms. Salas, within the last two terms of their study. The deadline to submit the portfolio for their last semester will be set early enough to allow for processing.
      • GPA will confirm if the student is eligible for portfolio submission. If the student is not eligible, GPA will inform the student.
    2. If the student is eligible, GPA will confirm that the portfolio is submitted as one file. If not, GPA will email the student and ask the student for re-submit.
    3. GPA will forward the file to the student’s advisor together with the portfolio guidelines and assessment document. The advisor will be given 2 weeks to do the assessment.
    4. The advisor will e-mail their assessment to GPA.
      • If the evaluation is not acceptable, the student will have to re-submit. 2 submissions per semester are allowed. If both of these submissions are not acceptable, the student will have to wait for the next semester to re-submit. Maximum of 4 submissions will be allowed.
      • If the evaluation is acceptable by the advisor:
        1. GPA will prepare a letter to inform the student that their portfolio submission is accepted.

The purpose of the MSS&G portfolio evaluation is to test core knowledge in structures and geotechnical engineering that the student studied within the MS program. The portfolio will consist of taking a closed-book problem solving session. This process will be administered by the S&G Program Coordinator. The student must be present in person at the pre-announced session by the Coordinator. Remote participation will not be allowed. The student must complete the portfolio within three (3) hours, and one-page written note will be allowed to aid his/her memory related to the subjects.

The portfolio will cover 4 major topics from the MSS&G program out of the following areas:
Structural Engineering: Matrix Analysis, Design, Mechanics, and Dynamics
Geotechnical Engineering: Geotechnical Engineering, Foundations, and Pavement Design

The student must select four (4) topics, with a minimum of one (1) from each of the Structural Engineering and Geotechnical Engineering areas. Problems will be distributed among the appropriate faculty, depending on area of specialization.

The purpose of the portfolio evaluation is to test core knowledge of the student. The portfolio will consist of an open book problem solving covering 6 of the major topics that the student studied within the MS program.

The topics will be chosen from the following 8 topics: Air Pollution, Biological Process Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering, Applied Chemistry, Hydrology, Hydraulics, Solid and Hazardous Wastes, and Industrial Ecology. The portfolio will be designed to include the areas covered by the students MS course work.

The student will have one week to complete this submission and it will be evaluated to determine if the students’ performance is adequate. If not the student may attempt a second time the next academic year semester (this process is not offered in summer).

This process will be administered by the Environmental Program Coordinator, and problems to grade will be distributed among the appropriate faculty depending on area of specialization.